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Quieting Down the Monkey Mind




The only word I can use for restorative yoga yesterday is phenomenal! I was drawn to this new studio for two reasons, my old one closed and this new studio has an open hand as its logo. It seemed welcoming and it was. It is called Ahimsa, meaning do no harm—especially to yourself. I was drawn to the particular class I went to because in its description it mentioned that it helps quiet down the monkey (busy) mind.
Good grief! Don’t we all, living in these times, have monkey mind? Couldn’t we all stand to be kinder and gentler to ourselves? We are our own worse critics about everything including our looks, talents, skills and abilities.

I don’t know what had gotten into me, except that it must have been monkey mind. I have not been in a class to do restorative yoga in years! And, the years just keep sailing by. There are only so many that the Goddess grants us.

 Why? I ask myself, do I deny myself the simplest and purest pleasures in life? Why become some wrapped up in inner turmoil, creating chaos when it shouldn’t even exist?
The class I attended started off right, from the start. I expressed the anxiety I was having over being in a new class and in a new studio and the teacher spoke to my inner child. Like a caring mother, she just said, “Stop it” and I did.

That class was the single most relaxing hour and fifteen minutes I can remember spending doing yoga—maybe ever in my life and I’ve done a lot of yoga classes. There were Tibetan Singing Bowls placed on our bodies, chimes, and she spritzed hydrosols like rose water and essential oils on us. My favorite oil was a mixture with frankincense in it; followed by invigorating orange oil. Immediately, upon receiving the frankincense, I began to sink into a deeper state of relaxation than I thought was possible.
I was pleasantly surprised that the people were friendlier than at my last studio. I felt welcomed and at ease. There were some larger people there as well, so in that way I wasn’t alone. There is another class today and I am very tempted to go.


Thanks goes out to my husband for his Christmas gift of 10 classes at that studio!

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